Africa

Stock photography - Quiver tree

Unparalleled, Scenery, Wildlife, Monumental Africa In 2021.

City of cape town, south africa

Cape Town, South Africa

A coming-together of cultures, cuisines and landscapes, there’s nowhere quite like Cape Town, a singularly beautiful city crowned by the magnificent Table Mountain National Park. Table Mountain National Park defines the city. The flat-topped mountain is the headline act, but there are many other equally gorgeous natural landscapes within the park’s extensive boundaries. Cultivated areas, such as the historic Company’s Garden, Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden and Green Point Urban Park, also make exploring the city a pleasure. Follow the lead of locals by taking full advantage of the abundant outdoor space: learn to surf; go hiking or mountain biking; tandem-paraglide off Lion’s Head; abseil off the top of Table Mountain – just a few of the many activities on offer.

Source: Lonely Planet
www.lonelyplanet.com


Topi - Kenya

Maasai Mara, Kenya

Dream of Africa and chances are that you dream of the Masai Mara. This huge expanse of gently rolling grassland – specked with flat-topped acacia trees and trampled by massive herds of zebras and wildebeest – is the ultimate African cliché. But for once the reality lives up to the image and the Masai Mara, which comprises not just the famous reserve but also around a dozen community conservancies, several group ranches and numerous Maasai villages, is for many people not just the highlight of their Kenyan adventure but the very reason they came in the first place.

Source: Lonely Planet
www.lonelyplanet.com


Overlook of Eden Island, Seychelles, Mahe island

Mahé Island, Seychelles

Mother Nature was unbelievably generous with the Seychelles, a fabled paradise whose islands lie scattered across the Indian Ocean. Spellbinding beaches are the main attraction, and what beaches! Exquisite ribbons of sand lapped by turquoise waters and backed by lush hills, palm trees and Dali-esque boulders. Beyond the beach, diving and snorkelling are brilliant in the warm waters amid abundant marine life, while few places on the planet do ocean-side luxury quite like the Seychelles. Mahé is the largest island and entry point to the Seychelles, with some fabulous resorts, restaurants and beaches, not to mention the small capital city of Victoria. But it’s also the busiest island, with glorious Praslin and La Digue a short boat ride away. Even further out, there are real lost-world islands to be found.

Source: Lonely Planet
www.lonelyplanet.com


Group of giraffes walks in the park

Kruger National Park, South Africa

The Kruger National Park is the flagship of South Africa’s national parks and rated as the ultimate safari experience. By far the largest game reserve in South Africa, it is larger than Israel – nearly 2 million hectares of land that stretch for 352 kilometres (20 000 square kilometres) from north to south along the Mozambique border. It is considered to give you an almost indescribable wildlife experience. Certainly, it ranks as one of the best in Africa. Safaris in the Greater Kruger Park offers a unique range of luxury game lodges, safaris, activities and tours to make your wildlife experience nothing short of incredible. In terms of wildlife, Kruger National Park is one of the world’s greatest national parks. The diversity, density and sheer numbers of animals are almost unparalleled, and all of Africa’s iconic safari species live out their dramatic days here, along with a supporting cast of 137 other mammals and over 500 varieties of birds.

Source: African Safari Group
www.krugernationalpark.org.za


Sand dunes, Namibia.

Skeleton Coast, Namibia

Skeleton Coast Park Death would be preferable to banishment to such a country, declared the early Swedish explorer Charles John Andersson when he encountered tales of the Skeleton Coast. But this area, the Skeleton Coast Park, is now acknowledged as one of Namibia’s greatest treasures, in that it is one of the world’s last great wildernesses. Initially proclaimed in 1971, in its present form in 1973, it extends from the Ugab River in the south for 500 km to the Kunene River in the north and about 40 km inland. Dense coastal fogs and cold sea breezes caused by the cold Benguela Current add atmosphere to the windswept beaches that are littered with shipwrecks, bones and other debris. The park also contains rich lichen fields (more than 100 species have been recorded), is a sanctuary for desert dwelling elephants, rhino and lion and the Kunene River mouth is a vital wetland.

Source: Namibia Tourism
www.namibiatourism.com.na


Saadian pavilion,Menara gardens and Atlas in Marrakech, Morocco,

Marrakech, Morocco

Prepare for your senses to be slapped. Marrakesh’s heady sights and sounds will dazzle, frazzle and enchant. Put on your babouches (leather slippers) and dive right in. Bahia Palace and the Dar Si Said are a riot of tilework and intricate floral painted-wood ceilings, the Saadian Tombs are enriched by an opulent bounty of marble, while the Musée de Mouassine and Musée de Marrakech are a showcase of swirling stucco and carved-wood design. Think of the medina’s souqs as a shopping mall, but laid out according to a labyrinthine medieval-era plan. Got your map ready? Well, it’s probably of little use to you here. Wrapped within the 19 kilometres of powder-pink rammed-earth ramparts, the medina is Marrakesh’s show-stopping sight of crowded souqs, where sheep carcasses swing from hooks next door to twinkling lamps, and narrow, doodling ochre-dusted lanes lead to nowhere.

Source: Lonely Planet
www.lonelyplanet.com


Panorama of Cairo

Cairo, Egypt

Cairo is chaos at its most magnificent, infuriating and beautiful. From above, the distorted roar of the muezzins’ call to prayer echoes out from duelling minarets. Below, car horns bellow tuneless symphonies amid avenues of faded 19th-century grandeur while donkey carts rattle down dusty lanes lined with colossal Fatimid and Mamluk monuments. This mega-city’s constant buzz and noise is a product of its 22-or-so million inhabitants simultaneously crushing Cairo’s infrastructure under their collective weight and lifting its spirits up with their exceptional humour. Your nerves will jangle, your snot will run black from the smog and touts will hound you at every turn, but it’s a small price to pay to tap into the energy of the place Egyptians call Umm Ad Dunya – the Mother of the World.

Source: Lonely Planet
www.lonelyplanet.com


Bridge over Victoria Falls

Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe and Zambia

Victoria Falls known as the “Smoke that thunders” in the local Tonga language, is the largest single curtain of falling water in the world and 70% of the exquisite views are seen from the Zimbabwe rain forest. The rain forest which has constant rain 24/7 from the never ending spray of the Falls, has unique ecosystem. It is a botanists dream and bird lovers’ paradise. There are species here that don’t occur anywhere else, and our recommendation is to look just a little beyond the pathway and the numerous viewpoints. One of the beauties is that the area has not become over commercialized. In fact, once you are standing by the Falls your view will not be much different to that of David Livingstone’s who first saw the Falls in 1855.Walking within the Falls is a couple of kilometers and it does get very hot.

Source: Zimbabwe Tourism
www.zimbabwetourism.net

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *